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Thread: Competition, Friction or Good ole fashion caching

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Russellville
    Posts
    367
    Hey ASD - we got you beat I just added South Carolina to make it 17 states, plus Washington DC and Mexico. Hope to get Georgia later in the week.

    I agree with you. We are in competition with ourselves to see how many neat places and creative caches we can find. There is also a small competition among the four of us to find the cache. Everybody wants to be the one to find it (especially if it's a Nonnipoppy or Golfnutz cache). Yet we all share equally in the find and and excited no matter who finds it. Certainly no one is disapointed if they are one that didn't find it.
    "Honey, we're not normal people. We're the Griswolds. "


  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Here and There
    Posts
    14
    Well, all I am saying is a lot of people think it is a competition even if they won't admit it. As for lame caches, man I am not going to list the number of caches I have found in the state of Arkansas I consider lame, but its more than you could count on your digits. As for caching in other states, that is by FAR the most fun you can have. I have seen waterfalls in Arkansas, and some really cool places in the state, but take a trip to Colorado, or North Carolina, get up in the mountains and see some REALLY nice places that you can't see around here, plus find a cache or two to, now that is a blast.

    Unfortunately I have a job that doesn't allow me to travel here, there, and yonder, so I have to do my caching out of state only when my place of employment is either A: closed, or B: they let me take a couple of days vacation. So to that I say, must be nice. Course one thing about it, this is the best job I have ever had, the money is good, the company is excellent, and the managers and employees get along great. So I guess I better stick with it.

    But, its cool though, as BACKPACKNJACK said, everyone has an opinion, but also as I said don't even get me started on lame caches, cause I can name a few.

    DK
    No Comment

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Fort Smith, AR
    Posts
    846
    Lets here them because if someone thought one of mine was lame I would want to know, this way I could do something to spice it up.
    If your not living life on the edge your taking up too much space!!!!!!


  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Here and There
    Posts
    14
    Well, let me go through my list and I will let you know if any of yours are on there. As I think I have said, I like a little something to see when I go geocaching. I mean what is the point of a altoids tin hidden down a dirt road about 30' off the road? Not a THING!!!! I mean come on you get in your car, drive down the dirt road till you have the coordinates pretty well zeroed in, pull the car over, get out go write your name in the log, and off you go.

    Now, some people might enjoy that, I on the other hand don't. I have seen some good caches that you can just drive right up to and grab, that are pretty good caches, nice location and everything, I have also been to a cache or two (not in the state) that you had to hike for almost 2 miles one way. Once I found the cache there was nothing but junk, and NO log book to sign. Thankfully I had a extra piece of paper with me. If it hadn't been off of a trail around a really nice lake in a really nice area. I would have been really upset to walk all that way and not get to log the cache, but the saving grace would have been it was in a really nice park.

    I know you have to look beyond the cache itself that is what I try to do everytime I go caching, but come on you can just about tell a good cache from a lame one from the area you are in. Hell, I don't care about the cache as long as the area is good. I have seen caches, in lots of rest areas around the country, at least they have a purpose, they make you get out and stretch your legs a bit, which is probably a good thing when you are driving 18 hours, I guess maybe it is I wish a cache had a purpose not that it is lame or not, but some kind of purpose would be good.

    From GC.com: "You are ultimately responsible for the cache so make sure you know the rules for the area where your cache is being placed.

    Ultimately you'll want to place a cache in a place that is UNIQUE in some way. The big reward for geocachers, other than finding the cache itself, is the location. A prime camping spot, great viewpoint, unusual location, etc. are all good places to hide a cache. "

    DK
    No Comment

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    34
    I'm glad our post has genertated such good conversation.. It makes you think about the caches you place as well as the ones you look for.. DK has some good points. When you go so far to find a cache it is kind of dissappionting to find you are at a garbage dump or out in the boonies with nothing insteresting to see or do.. It seems we hit a never ending run of these and other days it great and fun caches. I am glad everyone is stating thier choice and Letting the rest of us know we need to be more thoughtful about placing caches. There are a high ratio of micro and not as many traditional caches and it seems ashame to go miles to find a cache and to have three or four micros in the same place. Maybe we could reread the geocache general info pages and come up with so more imaginative caches than micros...they are almost as bad as the virtuals once were. How many of the last 20 caches you have done that weren't the majority were micro. (Our opinion) I think we could all spend a little more time thinking about what we would like to find when we place caches. In other states the majority are historical or parks, trail , educational area, something to see, do, or learn. Well again we preach on.. javascript:emoticon('')
    javascript:emoticon('')We just hope that 2005 is a wonderful year for all Arkansas geo cachers.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Here and There
    Posts
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by twooldcrows
    I'm glad our post has genertated such good conversation.. It makes you think about the caches you place as well as the ones you look for.. DK has some good points. When you go so far to find a cache it is kind of dissappionting to find you are at a garbage dump or out in the boonies with nothing insteresting to see or do.. It seems we hit a never ending run of these and other days it great and fun caches. I am glad everyone is stating thier choice and Letting the rest of us know we need to be more thoughtful about placing caches. There are a high ratio of micro and not as many traditional caches and it seems ashame to go miles to find a cache and to have three or four micros in the same place. Maybe we could reread the geocache general info pages and come up with so more imaginative caches than micros...they are almost as bad as the virtuals once were. How many of the last 20 caches you have done that weren't the majority were micro. (Our opinion) I think we could all spend a little more time thinking about what we would like to find when we place caches. In other states the majority are historical or parks, trail , educational area, something to see, do, or learn. Well again we preach on.. javascript:emoticon('')
    javascript:emoticon('')We just hope that 2005 is a wonderful year for all Arkansas geo cachers.
    My point exactly, I enjoy a good virtual cache, and I don't mind a good micro, but it seems like everyone and their dog is putting a film can here, or an altoids breath strip container there.......
    VERY well said twooldcrows!!!!

    DK
    No Comment

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Morrilton
    Posts
    327
    I think I have made a profound discovery, by reading between the lines, and putting two and two together: A lame cache is a micro.

    One man's lame is another man's dame.


    Take time to smell the roses and love the grandkids.

  8. #28
    I think I have made a profound discovery, by reading between the lines, and putting two and two together: A lame cache is a micro.
    I disagree with that statement. While I prefer a standard cache, a good micro is not the cache box and contents itself but the location. I have discovered a few interesting locations through micros. Historical, scenic or just an unusual place is good for a micro.

    What I enjoy most is the find/hunt. My first multicache I found I got more and more excited at each step until (in a manic state) found the final step.

    Happy hunting.

    walkingshadow and red

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Maumelle, AR
    Posts
    211
    Well, my youngest doesn't like Micro's because there are no toys in them. However, I and my older son like the increased challenge in finding a micro. Also many micros are urban, and can be hidden in an interesting place where a regular cache wouldn't be practical.

    I do prefer caches that are interesting, and take me somewhere I've not been before. Now that I think about it, that is what I like about some micros. They are often like virtuals in that they are somewhere interesting and worth a visit. The micros I don't really care much for are the ones that are in the middle of nowhere and are only a micro to make them harder to find. I don't like having to disturb nature too much looking for a cache, so I prefer not to have to rake up the leaves or pine straw looking for a micro that is under a rock, or something. I like to see something interesting with my cache, or for it to be very unique in nature. Something to make it worth the trip besides just running up my numbers.

    If you look at my stats, it becomes obvious that I don't care about the numbers. For a while I wasn't even logging my finds online. It is a long story, and there were many reasons. I am logging all finds online now, not for the numbers, but because I think cache owners and other visitors enjoy reading the log entries (I know I do) and having them online, instead of just in the logbook in the cache. I've had a cache muggled, for example, and never recovered the physical logbook.

    The bottom line is, my favorite caches are the ones where I think afterward "I never knew this was here" or "I'm so glad I did that one." To me, that is what makes a great cache.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    34
    We are glad that this article has gotten such good conversation going. We are not criticizing anyone or any cache in particular. It is there are some caches that make us wonder " Why would anyone take us here?" We have been to caches where we were meet by police, threatened, and or assaulted. It seems that the issue of gaining proper authorization has been a issue for us. It was discouraging to wonder what next. This situation has improved lately.We are not saying we don't like micros, but that there are places for them in urban areas where large boxes aren't practical. Like LD said it is frustrating to go in the middle of the woods and look for micros when there are a million places for one and you think to your self " I sure am glad I didn't get snake bit or an huge case of poision ivy.." And it is dissappionting to travel a long distance to find a micro in a car wash for example and then have someone tell you that you are trespassing on private property. We hope no one takes offense at this but these are issues that I'm sure many of us have confronted. The object should be something interesting, educational, scenic, hiking trail. good place to go fishing etc....

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