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RugerPilot345
12-10-2004, 03:08 PM
I think you have to really look deep inside on what you are looking for in a log. If you are putting caches out and the reason is to see how many creative logs people will give you, then I relate that to volunteer work. If you are doing volunteer work for inner peace and happiness or if you are doing volunteer work to gain public thanks from others. I think you should look inside for your reason for geocaching.......if you want more from your log entries then maybe you shouild put in your write-up that you want meaningful log entries and if the searcher does not have time to write one then please do not search for my geocache.......NOT.....be real, come on folks enjoy the sport, enjoy the hobby.....let it be what it will be, let's not make this great sport so hard that we run off people becasue they can't or don't write a good enough log entry. Just my thoughts!! 8)

nonnipoppy
06-27-2006, 09:10 PM
We have hidden several caches in the Clarksville area. We watch almost every cache in Johnson County that we do not own and a few others in the area so we see the logs for lots of caches.

Ocassionally we get someone caching here that chooses to type a message in one cache and then cut and paste that exact message in lots of other cache logs. We have been guilty of this ourselves in a few situations.

We are aware of a cacher in another state that has posted on his cache pages that cut and paste logs are unacceptable for his caches and will be deleted. He says that he went to a considerable expense in time creativity and money to supply a cache that can be sought the least a cacher can do is an individual log for each cache.

What do you think about this? We are looking for feedback not necessarily agreement. Please tell us what you think about this....poppy

arkhiker
06-27-2006, 09:43 PM
I agree with you. Those who put time, effort, and expense into a cache should be rewarded with logs that reflect the impressions and thoughts of the seeker(s). I know that I appreciate it when somebody hunts one of mine and lets me know of their accounts and experiences.
The flip-side is also true. Those caches that consist of a 35 mm film canister under a Wal-Mart lightpole skirt deserve just as much effort in the logs. When I hunt those simple caches, I'm just 'going for the numbers.' The owner is lucky to get more than a TFTC from me.

arkansas_stickerdude
06-27-2006, 10:03 PM
I don't care as long as someone finds it. I do try to add a little more to my logs It might have a cut and paste log but I'll add more if I remember something about the cache.

Gaddiel
06-27-2006, 10:55 PM
It seems just a matter of common courtesy to me. I'm not saying that our logs are eloquent, well thought out, insightful, or even meaningful in any way, but I don't recall ever doing a copy and paste. There's always SOMETHING unique you can say about the cache, the location, the trip, the thoughts in your head, the turtle you ran across, or..... well something.

Yeah, it takes a little extra time and effort, but I figure I owe the hider at least that much...

Wayne

bone
06-28-2006, 06:04 AM
I have to say I have never done this I may not write alot for certain caches, but I try to tell exactly what happened at that cache. We haven't found very many but we have been to more than one in a day and I've never had the same thing happen to me twice at two different caches. I try to take the time to write on about our experience at caches, but if it's a skirtlifter not to much to write about.

SJClimber
06-28-2006, 07:24 AM
The simplest hide/find deserves a fresh comment, even if it's just a "thanks" for the owner's efforts. As the hide becomes more complex and the adventure more involved, that "new" story is fun for all to read. This thread parallels another "gripe" about people who just leave labels at the cache. Both behaviors seem a form of laziness.

mountainborn
06-28-2006, 08:56 AM
The reason I place a cache is to let people have an opportunity to see a place I think is beautiful and worth seeing, or, a simple micro to help lead them into a area where a regular cache is located ( a trail marker ).
Any demand that I place upon the finder of a cache would in my opinion diminish their overall geocaching experience.
If they falsely say they have found the cache, they have not cheated me out of anything.
They may have only cheated themselves out of a great out of doors experience.
That is a choice they will make without any input from me.
Because I want to enhance their experience, if I can, not diminish it.
If they feel satisfied by signing the log only, or placing a sticker on the cache, or initialing the cache container, it is just fine with me.

I sometimes do not log a cache because the hider has showed so much attitude about their cache that they make a statement similar to:
" if your signature is not in this log book your find will be deleted, I will check every one ".
>
My reasoning is this
Logs get wet
Logs get lost
Logs get stolen
Logs get too full
Caches get put back in the wrong place
Caches can be carried away by wildlife
Caches can be ruined by contents that are placed in them
>
The list can just go on and on.
>
I have sat down after finding a cache and just enjoied the scenery, once I got to bird watching and took a nap, then just walked away, forgetting to even open the cache container. :oops:
>
So, what do you think I should have done about that particular cache ?
Log it ?
Not log it ?
Only write a note to the cache page ?

BACKPACKNJACK
06-28-2006, 02:56 PM
I try my best to find something good and or different to say about the simplest of cache hides and if a cache isnít good enough to post something nice I just do not log it at all. I donít go for the numbers, it just isnít my thing, and if the adventure wasnít worth it to me then logging it isnít either.
Some folks like film canisters just dropped in the leaves for no apparent reason and donít think them lame at all but I think they should have at least painted it the color of the leaves if they want me to post something good about it.
As far as deleting a claimed find, well I havenít done it yet but maybe should have a few times when not finding their IDís in the cache, except they actually didnít cheat me or harm my cache so I donít care.
Now when one of my caches is left out that wasnít supposed to be left out and I actually know it wasnít the cacher before them (I check my caches often) I sometimes would like to delete their find....and pull their caching license for awhile, but it takes all kinds.
BPNJ's 2 cents.

The_Griswolds
06-28-2006, 04:43 PM
Nothing irks me more about Geocaching than getting a cut and paste log. We recently had a log entry that was an asterick - that was it. I have seen cache pages that said the owner would delete cut and paste logs, and seriously considered it myself, but a couple of things stopped me.

First, it would place me in the same category as the logger - i.e. jerky cacher. More than likely it would just start a flaming contest and the log would be ammended, but still wouldn't be appreciative.
Secondly, I tend to stay away from caches with a lot of 'rules' on the cache page. Just doesn't seem friendly.

I think the only way to fight it is to find one of their caches and do the same. In fact, simply logging "cut and paste" might do it :twisted:

But on the bright side, it only takes one real good log entry to make up for a dozen bad ones. And a REALLY good log entry will get me motivated to hide more caches.

Geezer_Veazey
06-28-2006, 05:28 PM
I think the only way to fight it is to find one of their caches and do the same. In fact, simply logging "cut and paste" might do it :twisted:

Great idea, Griswolds. You don't even have to find their caches. Go to their profile, log a note on every cache they have placed with "cut and paste."

On the flip side, when someone writes a good log for one of mine, I often send them an email telling them how much I appreciate it. It only takes a few clicks and a very few minutes and it reinforces their good habits.

Geezer

nonnipoppy
06-28-2006, 06:48 PM
The reason I place a cache is to let people have an opportunity to see a place I think is beautiful and worth seeing, or, a simple micro to help lead them into a area where a regular cache is located ( a trail marker ).
Any demand that I place upon the finder of a cache would in my opinion diminish their overall geocaching experience.
If they falsely say they have found the cache, they have not cheated me out of anything.
They may have only cheated themselves out of a great out of doors experience.
That is a choice they will make without any input from me.
Because I want to enhance their experience, if I can, not diminish it.
If they feel satisfied by signing the log only, or placing a sticker on the cache, or initialing the cache container, it is just fine with me.

I sometimes do not log a cache because the hider has showed so much attitude about their cache that they make a statement similar to:
" if your signature is not in this log book your find will be deleted, I will check every one ".
>
My reasoning is this
Logs get wet
Logs get lost
Logs get stolen
Logs get too full
Caches get put back in the wrong place
Caches can be carried away by wildlife
Caches can be ruined by contents that are placed in them
>
The list can just go on and on.
>
I have sat down after finding a cache and just enjoied the scenery, once I got to bird watching and took a nap, then just walked away, forgetting to even open the cache container. :oops:
>
So, what do you think I should have done about that particular cache ?
Log it ?
Not log it ?
Only write a note to the cache page ?



Hey Mountainborn, I was referring to the log posted on the cache page. :roll:
I seldom write anything more than date/name/Clarksville Ar on the cache logs but the log on the cache page is different......That's what I'm talkin about.......poppy

nonnipoppy
06-28-2006, 06:52 PM
I think the only way to fight it is to find one of their caches and do the same. In fact, simply logging "cut and paste" might do it :twisted:

This is an interesting idea as is Geezer's.





But on the bright side, it only takes one real good log entry to make up for a dozen bad ones. And a REALLY good log entry will get me motivated to hide more caches.

Amen on this, one good log helps salve a lot of TFTCs.

mountainborn
06-28-2006, 08:16 PM
poppy said:
Hey Mountainborn, I was referring to the log posted on the cache page.
I seldom write anything more than date/name/Clarksville Ar on the cache logs but the log on the cache page is different......That's what I'm talkin about.......poppy
>
Right, but if any of those things happen to the cache log then the owner won't see the signature and could delete your find. If they were one of those demanding types that require you to be on the cache log or they will delete.
>
So even if you had the greatest of times hunting their cache, and wrote the most glowing of reports, it could be deleted because something happened to the cache log. They would assume that you had not been there and were falsely logging a find.
>
My point is that the hider's attitude can damage the over all experience, by placing demands upon the finder.

nonnipoppy
06-28-2006, 08:22 PM
Well truthfull I have not taken the time to compare the cache logs with the online logs for the reasons you stated. They aren't cheating me. I have just had a rash of cut and paste logs recently that kind of irratated me.....poppy

mountainborn
06-28-2006, 08:31 PM
Well truthfull I have not taken the time to compare the cache logs with the online logs for the reasons you stated. They aren't cheating me. I have just had a rash of cut and paste logs recently that kind of irratated me.....poppy
>
You are right, if the cache owner compares the logs against each other then finds reasons to delete they are trying to make themself the "enforcer".
For me it is not about trying to make every one geocache as I think it should be.
>
To me a cut paste log entry is the finder missing out on a good chance to tell about just how much fun they had.
>
Yeh, I guess we all feel a little "short changed' when we get a copy paste log entry on a cache we have hidden.

arkhiker
06-28-2006, 08:33 PM
I've never compared the physical logs with the online logs either. I have retrieved a few logs from my caches where the most that was written was what was taken and what was left. For me, that is just fine.
What I look forward to is an interesting log waiting for me in my Inbox at the end of the day. I don't know anybody who will check their physical caches every day to see who has visited, but I can think of quite a few who check their email for the same reason.
It's like a little present waiting to be opened when I see that "[LOG] Owner: " in the subject line.

flannelman
06-28-2006, 08:48 PM
Boring!!! Plain and simple. I don't like them and I would rather see just a TFTC and what was traded than to see the sam log over and over for very different caches. I love to read the logs for my caches. Some of my caches are in very scenic places and tough places to get to. Old River Runner left a great log for my Man, what a climb!! cache.

Thanks to all who put out the effort to write good logs.

nonnipoppy
06-28-2006, 08:53 PM
Lots of folks write good logs but I think ORR does a great descriptive job every time........poppy

nonnipoppy
06-28-2006, 08:59 PM
rkl and I went to Ft Smith last Sunday and I found 41 caches. They were every one micro caches. At first I wondered what I could write about them all but in a moment of inspiration this log came to mind. The cache is X Marks the Spot Almost (WGJN):

Don't believe all that CacheNaFlash tells you about that big X. He is one of them.
The barefaced truth is that if you go stand on that spot for 68.7 seconds you will be teleported up into one of the UFOs that are housed in the closed off area of Ft Chaffee.

When you are inside the spacecraft you will be stripped and become the subject of loads of experiments. What ever the current whims of the TriLateral Commission is at the moment dictates the scope of the tests.

Prevention of those aliens reentering your head and downloading your entire brain database while you sleep is done by wearing a beenie cap made of aluminum foil under your gimme cap from the local bank.

This truly works. Thanks for an opportunity to out those suckers even if I do put myself at risk. nonnipoppy Clarksville Ar

BACKPACKNJACK
06-28-2006, 09:03 PM
How many of these logs have yíall seen for your caches and for those youíve found lately?
ďOn our way to GW4 TFTCĒ
Now that would be...cloned and copied and pasted. :roll:

paris1time
06-28-2006, 10:12 PM
My wife and I are fairly new to the geocaching community and so far we are having a blast.

I have noticed that many pairs and/or teams of geocachers have a single geocaching.com ID. My wife and I decided to go ahead and create separate IDís. The main reason for this was in case we went geocaching at some time without the other, but so far all of our finds have been with each other. We also recently introduced our daughter to geocaching and set up her own gc.com ID.

My wife is not one that does very much on the computer and our daughter does not do much on the site yet, so I have logged their finds for them so far.

In my short time in geocaching I have 5 hides and look forward to checking my email to see if someone has found one and read what they had to say. I like to extend the same to those caches I find and write about our experience searching for their cache. I type my ďFound ItĒ log first and write a log entry that is unique to each cache. However, for my wife and daughter I usually cut and past a log for their ďFound ItĒ and refer back to my post. Itís not that they had nothing interesting to say it would just be repetitive and if I did not do it for them the find would never be logged online.

While on the topic of logs, I actually found a couple that I know and they found one of my caches and I noticed they never logged it online. When I read their ID on my physical log I found their profile on gc.com and it showed they only had 1 find. They told me they had found approximately 30 finds in the last 3 years and are only casual geocachers, but I guess they donít log their finds online.

06-28-2006, 11:16 PM
I cut and paste frequently when I have a long caching day and hit ten or twelve caches, but I also add something to the part that I cut and paste about the individual cache....if it deserves it.

For instance I might open with a paragraph about "I spent the day in the heresville and found x caches in the area....." which I'll cut and save for caches 2 thru whatever, but then I'll add individual notes about the cache I'm logging.

Something like "This one had a great view, (insert paragraph here) and was cool" for a good one, and for the Wal-mart, skirt lifting micro one sentence like "Wow, another perverted cache. whoo hoo."

If the hider wants to delete my log because they didn't like the cut'n'paste or feel that skirt lifting isn't perverted, they are free to delete it. It won't make their cache any more interesting or negate the fact that I found it. It won't mean jack to me because I'm not in it for the numbers. And it won't make me write something better for their next cache.

The only thing that will make me write something new, interesting, and unique about a cache is finding a new, interesting, and unique cache.

AR_kayaker

nonnipoppy
06-28-2006, 11:28 PM
I have noticed that many pairs and/or teams of geocachers have a single geocaching.com ID. My wife and I decided to go ahead and create separate IDís. The main reason for this was in case we went geocaching at some time without the other, but so far all of our finds have been with each other. We also recently introduced our daughter to geocaching and set up her own gc.com ID.

My wife is not one that does very much on the computer and our daughter does not do much on the site yet, so I have logged their finds for them so far.

In my short time in geocaching I have 5 hides and look forward to checking my email to see if someone has found one and read what they had to say. I like to extend the same to those caches I find and write about our experience searching for their cache. I type my ďFound ItĒ log first and write a log entry that is unique to each cache. However, for my wife and daughter I usually cut and past a log for their ďFound ItĒ and refer back to my post. Itís not that they had nothing interesting to say it would just be repetitive and if I did not do it for them the find would never be logged online.

This is a situation that is IMHO understandable for those cut and paste type logs. nonnipoppy is a team of my wife and I if she had a seperate identity at GC.com it would probably not have any finds. She does not want to budget the time to log the caches. So they would be cut and paste or none at all.

The cacher mentioned in the original post was in the area that GWIV attendees created lots of cut and paste logs. Possibly that is a byproduct of lots of cachers being around and logging lots of caches and then forgetting them before the time to log. If I get three cache days behind in my logs then I can't remember the caches to write much individual info about. As I said in the original post I have also been guilty. It happens when we get really greedy in our caching.



While on the topic of logs, I actually found a couple that I know and they found one of my caches and I noticed they never logged it online. When I read their ID on my physical log I found their profile on gc.com and it showed they only had 1 find. They told me they had found approximately 30 finds in the last 3 years and are only casual geocachers, but I guess they donít log their finds online.

There seem to be some cachers that just don't care to log online. That is the way they play the game.

mountainborn
06-29-2006, 04:10 AM
poppy said:
There seem to be some cachers that just don't care to log online. That is the way they play the game.
>
You know, that is one of the best parts of the game, each of us can do it the way we feel is most enjoyable for us.
I don't much care for caches where the owner lays out strict guidelines for the completion to his satisfaction.

mbell72901
06-29-2006, 12:30 PM
I love the "sweet" logs like the one below...........

"Well I don't like rocks and after this cache attempt I don't like you any more either. The nearby Bob White seemed to be mocking my failure with his darn incessant call. I wish I had a shotgun with me. [;D]"

......all in jest......he shall remain nameless.
:D

ps. I left you a bone on the log.

cachemates
06-29-2006, 05:49 PM
When a cacher places caches, his only reward for the expense, time, effort and maintainence of those caches are the logs of other cachers. That is the the reason we place caches. The logs give you some idea how you are doing placing your caches. I think we all enjoy reading good logs from others, I know I do. That is what I do most nights is read logs from most of your caches. If all I ever got was cut and pasted logs I would probably take up all my ammo cans, Drill holes in the bottom of them and plant flowers in them. Or make wind chimes out of them.

When we go somewhere over the weekend caching and find several caches, it takes me days, maybe even a week to get all of them logged. We usually write something down in a notebook about each cache so I can remember each one. I could copy and paste and be done in just a few minutes, but I feel the cache owner deserves more than that. Without his cache I wouldn't have anything to look for.

nonnipoppy
06-29-2006, 05:55 PM
I love the "sweet" logs like the one below...........

"Well I don't like rocks and after this cache attempt I don't like you any more either. The nearby Bob White seemed to be mocking my failure with his darn incessant call. I wish I had a shotgun with me. [;D]"

......all in jest......he shall remain nameless.
:D

ps. I left you a bone on the log.

I'll bet you it ain't cut and paste. 8O 8O 8O Wanna bet :?: :?: :?:

arkhiker
06-29-2006, 08:31 PM
When a cacher places caches, his only reward for the expense, time, effort and maintainence of those caches are the logs of other cachers. That is the the reason we place caches. The logs give you some idea how you are doing placing your caches. I think we all enjoy reading good logs from others, I know I do. That is what I do most nights is read logs from most of your caches. If all I ever got was cut and pasted logs I would probably take up all my ammo cans, Drill holes in the bottom of them and plant flowers in them. Or make wind chimes out of them.

This is why I put so much thought into my caches. I don't know if it shows, but I spend quite a bit of effort in what, how, and where my hides go. I have to say that I do all of it simply for the logs. I enjoy reading both compliments and suggestions on how I could improve.
I recently placed a new cache in Conway. I spent the most time trying to figure out where to put it. I wanted it to be urban (as urban as Conway can get anyway). Since it is a rather large container, I brainstormed for days before settling on its present location. Since it was published, I have had two Found It logs, and both were interesting reads. This is reward enough for me.

I never thought of ammo cans as wind chimes. I wonder if the wife would go for that?!? :wink:

Rhone
07-02-2006, 08:55 AM
Normally when I make a cache run, I bring along a clip board with a list of the caches I plan to hunt sorted according to the route that I plan on using. Each time I find one, I write a brief comment regarding the container and how it was hidden. When I log the finds on the website, I then go through the list so that I can hopefully include something in the log relevant to each cache. This is particularly helpful if one finds more than just a few caches on a particular day.

It is not uncommon to see such things as, "Found it," and nothing else, which I don't particularly like, but most cachers seem to take enough time say a little more than that. I generally try to make my hides unique in some small way, hopefully to prompt more interesting logs. Some folks are much more creative than others, some have great difficulty in writing anything. It takes all kinds. Although I enjoy a good log, I appreciate any log because I am just happy that someone took the time to hunt for a cache, and hopefully had a good experience while doing so.

Team_Pink
07-03-2006, 05:31 PM
Well, Nonnipoppy, you posted your message on the 27th and I came to Clarksville on the 28th to do the loop and cut and pasted quite a few. I did try to add something unique about each cache but it was usually a pretty short addition to the pasted text.

I cut and pasted with this thinking.

I look at the cache page as someone who is just reading one or two caches that I cut and pasted and not reading everyone of them. The caches were found on a caching trip and all of them share that trips uniqueness. They are part of a larger thing not a cache that I singled out to find. If someone is reading the cache that contains one of my logs, I don't know that they are reading every cache I did while on my trip. The owner knows I cut and pasted but the cache hunter may not. I feel like the logs are for the other cache hunters as well as the owner.

This past week there have been a couple of cachers finding several caches I have hidden. One cacher would post "Number X of the day and having a good time" and the other poster would only post "TFTC". I ran across them today only by accident and they were truly having a good time. I'm glad they where and if they felt like logging was a necessary evil that had to be done and was no where as much fun as hunting and taunting each other all day, so be it. I'm glad I could add to their fun, even if they did not communicate to me how much fun they were having.

Of course, I like it when someone posts a funny story like GolfNutz running off the road and leaving tracks that people comment about weeks later, but I personally don't have any negative feelings when someone cut and pastes. I actually like a cut and paste better than a four letter acronym.

TheAlabamaRambler
07-03-2006, 06:14 PM
As one a them dirty cut-n-pasters I intend no offense, nor do I seek to deprive cache owners of any reading pleasure, but I just don't have much to say about most caches.

When I first started I wrote eloquent and, according to others, funny logs, then around 1000 finds started to cut-n-paste because most of my caching was in groups, and we tended to hit 50-100 in a trip. Logging all that was a pain, so then it was hit-and-misss whether I logged any, then around 2000 stopped logging altogether. Now I rarely cache alone and don't even keep track of the finds we make each day - couldn't log them if I wanted to, except for a few really memorable caches or interesting happenings along the trail.

That's just what's comfortable for me, not a commentary on the cache or owner.

As far as the owner deriving his enjoyment from the logs, I do that as well. I love to read the logs, but if someone fails to leave one it's no issue to me; I truly believe in the phrase "Play it your way!"

Have fun out there!
Ed

mbell72901
08-14-2006, 03:01 PM
I accidently found this log posted on "Oklahoma's Lamest Cache", thought everyone might get a kick out of this posting..........not a cookie cutter log. LOL

<>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>><<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
I found this cache on a sweltering hot summer day (actually it was cloudy and kinda rainy). The choice of hide site
itself was ingenious, as who else but Darkmoon could have been sensitive
enough and intuitive enough -- indeed, enough of a poet and artisan -- to
have realized that every lamppost in this parking lot needed a microcache in
its base in order to achieve its highest order of spiritual and inner
fulfillment in its time on earth? And who else but Darkmoon could have, and
would have, been courageous enough to respond to the heartfelt cry of this
lamppost for a microcache of its very own, and who else would have been
strong enough and resourceful enough -- and creative enough -- to have found
this magnificent 35mm film canister, and lovingly crafted it into a cache
container, and then lovingly and religiously placed it in such a daring and
scintillating spot, a spot so magical, so special, that my eyes fill with
tears as I write this log entry, just as they did in that sacred and holy
parking lot earlier this afternoon, whence and where those beneficent tears
mixed with the sweat on my face on that hot summer afternoon, and then those
sacred tears of joy and love streamed off my face and bathed the tiny paper
logbook as I prepared to return it to its magical 35mm canister, its special
chalice, then to return it lovingly to its special designated altar, its
resting spot where it can lie nestled in safety, guarded by the noble tall
cylindrical sentinel known generically to the heathens and the uninitiated
as a "lamp post" but known to any true red-blooded and sincere geocacher as
a "Sentinel of microcache guardianship with attendant beacon of
yellowish-white light from GE 5169Y sodium vapor lamp at apex".

And, after I had replaced the sacred vessel inside the sacred altar known as
"Sentinel of microcache guardianship with attendant beacon of
yellowish-white light from GE 5169Y sodium vapor lamp at apex", I fell to my
knees, overcome with joy and awe, and I prayed to the Holy Lame Urban 35mm
Microcache, thanking it for its beneficence, and thanking it for its
blessing, and then, further overcome by its magnificence and by my
comparative shallowness and banality and unworthiness, not to mention my
sins, I cast my torso upon the hot scorching pavement, wailing and crying
and screaming, and flailing my fists against the hot unyielding pavement,
now covered with the blood of my righteous and wrathful self-directed fury,
at the injustice that one so unworthy as I should have dared to have touched
a sacred Lame Urban Micro 35mm Film Canister, and with the thought that I
had -- without the requisite 22 hours of prior cleansing and fasting -- also
dared to approach its sacred altar, known as a "Sentinel of microcache
guardianship with attendant beacon of yellowish-white light from GE 5169Y
sodium vapor lamp at apex", in the first place. And, so finally, my homage
to the sacred cache was complete, and satiated and bloody, yet filled with
bliss and joy at this exposure to The Sacred and The Holy, I returned to my
car. Signed logbook with tears and blood, took nothing, left five $100 bills
as a small token of my offering to this cache and to the Lame Urban micro
35mm Film Canister Cache Gods. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for
this wonderful cache and religious icon, and for this chance to once again
worship the Demigod of Lame Urban 35mm Microcaches. Thank you Darkmoon!

idratherbehiking
08-15-2006, 08:55 PM
I have actually decided to take up writing short stories again. Something i quit doing about 15 years ago. I was thinking the other day that just for fun I would use my logs on all my finds for practice if I have the time. I hope I don't bore anyone with them, I will keep them short.