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NatureFish
08-12-2005, 10:36 AM
I am opening this thread as a place where you can get answers to questions that may be of interest to a wider audience than a private communication would address.

The fastest and most dependable way to get me remains NatureFish@gmail.com, which is checked every few hours and gets precedence over all other email, but I will try to check this thread every day.

Only generic questions about geocaching and the guidelines that might be of interest to the community should be posted here - listing-specific and interpersonal communications should be done via Reviewer Notes or email to NatureFish@gmail.com

Reviewing cache listings is necessarily a bit arbitrary, and one cache placement or answer does not set precedence for another, so an answer here may conflict with the answers I apply to a particular listing request, depending on specific circumstances. If there appears to be inconsistancy it's because that's the nature of the game - few caches are exactly alike!

I encourage all geocachers to read the guidelines at http://www.geocaching.com/about/guidelines.aspx before asking a question here that's already covered.

Please remember that I am here to help and support you while maintaining the guidelines for placement and maintenance. I will do anything I can to help you get your cache listed properly. If you are unhappy with my decisions flaming will do no good whatsoever, just write to appeals@groundspeak.com with the listing ID number and details of why your cache should be allowed to violate the guidelines, or an explanation of just how my decision fails to apply them properly in this particular case.

Have fun!
NF

BACKPACKNJACK
01-23-2006, 08:46 PM
BUMP
I don't know what the BB ethics is on such things but this was about to drop off of the page and get buried. With all the new members and increased interest in caching I thought it was too important to let it fall.

Geezer_Veazey
01-23-2006, 10:32 PM
Sometimes a BUMP in the road is a good thing --- just don't bounce out if the top's down.

I do have a question. It's a Waymarking question and I don't know it that falls in your domain. Concerning Waymarks and State Parks; is there a policy from geocaching.com's point of view about placing waymarks in state parks? Last Sept. I added three waymarks in the Civilian Conservation Corps category for CCC structures in Petit Jean State Park. I did not seek park approval since there was no physical cache and the waymark coordinates all were in heavily traveled motorized and foot traffic. They were approved by the category owner who may or may not have been familiar with the approval process for physical caches.

Today I was thinking of adding another before the March 4th meeting and I went ahead and emailed the Park people, telling them also about the three I had already set up. I guess I'll hear from them in a few days, but was wondering if you knew anything about the waymarking in state parks situation.

Thanks,

Guy Veazey

NatureFish
01-24-2006, 10:35 AM
Waymarking replaced Locationless and Virtuals as a way to record a location - no cache is placed.

What you do with waymarking is much like taking a picture and making it into a postcard - zero impact on the location and no need for permission! Anywhere you can take a camera you can waymark.

The limitations of waymarking are strictly those of the landowner - if it's posted Private Property or No Access After Dark we'd appreciate it if you didn't create a waymark to lure folks there - or that you post the hours in the description.

The waymarking rules outlined in the FAQ are remarkably few.
See http://www.waymarking.com/help/faq.aspx

In a more direct answer - no, there are no permission requirements
and
No, Reviewers don't watch waymarking.com!

Waymarking is peer-reviewed, meaning that the rating system they use allows finders, even armchair internet cruisers who have never been there, to rate waymarks on a scale and thus indicate their overall value to the community.

I own the category Fishing Holes, where folks around the world list their favorite fishing spots and methods.

The only time I even look at it is to approve new waymarks or if I am taking a trip I'll look to see if there is an interesting fishing hole along the way!

Have fun,
Ed

01-24-2006, 09:04 PM
I've got a slightly more specific question, or at least one that a specific instance brought up.

Does a cache automatically become "temporarily disabled" if it doesn't get found for a length of time?

I ask because there is one that shows disabled that hasn't been found since last June that another cacher tells me should still be there (though not the owner, I haven't heard from them yet).

NatureFish
01-24-2006, 09:32 PM
No, there is no timer.

A cache lives forever, no matter how often found, unless it's manually disabled or archived for some reason.

Your previous Groundspeak Reviewer, MaxCacher, just traveled to Brazil from Tennesee to get one that hadn't been found in three years!

A cache may be disabled by the owner or Reviewer.

Many times the cache will get multiple DNFs or a Needs Maintenance or even a SBA note and the owner will disable the cache until he can get to it.

Sometimes a cache will be hidden in a snow zone, and disabled during the winter months.

Whatever the reason, owners often neglect to re-enable the cache, and there's no way for Reviewers to watch this.

If you see a cache that's been disabled a while, especially with no owner follow-up, file a SBA note and I will pursue it with the owner.

As far as a cache going a long time without being found - go find it! I fairly often look at the oldest unfounds in my PQ and go hunt 'em. Can be frustrating if it's gone, but highly rewarding if you find it!

Thanks,
Ed

NatureFish
02-13-2006, 07:43 AM
Many of you have noticed that your emailed PQs now contain two files, the second labeled 'waypoint'.

This is a new feature designed to be of mutual benefit to the geocaching and Reviewer communities.

The Additional Waypoints feature is being discussed in a thread in the main forums here:
http://forums.groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?showtopic=120544

The Additional Waypoints feature is designed as a way to manage caches with more than one waypoint.

Additional Waypoints introduce some powerful and flexible capabilities, but can can cause a bit of initial confusion when learning to use them, primarily because some can be hidden and some visible.

Examples would be:

A virtual tour of monuments leading to a final cache - waypoints could be visible except for the final.

Traditional Multi-cache - waypoints hidden

Puzzle cache - waypoints hidden or some hidden some visible

A nearby cool thing you want to point cachers to like parking coordinate or a nearby monument - waypoints visible

For Reviewers, Additional Waypoints will help us make sure that a new cache isn't too close to any existing caches or multicache waypoints. Until now Reviewers have had to manually maintain a database of all stages for this purpose, that's why we currently ask for all stages of a multi, and that's a lot of work! Using the Additional Waypoints feature for any multi will help us help you!

HINT: Reviewers, especially this one, appreciate and remember geocachers that help make our job easier!

TIP: It is easy to get this concept backwards - where you have a monument, for example, that you want to use as a virtual waypoint that leads to a final. If you list the monument's coords as primary and the final as an Additional Waypoint then only Premium Members that choose to use the Additional Waypoints will be able to see the coords to your final!

The proper way would be to list the final's coords as primary and any monuments of interest as Additional Waypoints.

Hope this helps!
Ed

NatureFish
02-13-2006, 09:50 AM
This topic is cross-posted, I hope you don't mind, but after writing it in another thread I felt that it was good info for all geocachers, and so am posting it here!

The basic question, paraphrased, was "Where is your geocaching turf?"

Great question, and one that I will chime in on because it is one of the most common issues that arise in new cache listings.

Geocachers get their new listings held up almost daily over this issue!

Herein the word 'you' is easier to type than 'the geocacher involved' so I am not using 'you' to address the OP (Original Poster) or you the reader directly, but the whole community of geocachers. Further, I am not particularly politically correct, so though I value and appreciate the women of geocaching I use "him" rather than dance around the him/her/he/she/them gender thing in my writings!


Where you normally geocache, the area that might be called your 'turf', is relevant to me only in the context of my ability to spot vacation and 'throwaway' caches... those that are too far off of your beaten path to realistically believe that you will maintain them.

You would not believe the number of proposed new listings submitted where it is obvious that the hider was driving down some highway far from home, sees an interesting tree and thinks "Hey, I have a microcache in my briefcase, I believe I'll throw 'er under that tree!" He'll get home, list it, and forget it. It becomes GeoTrash after the first couple of months, as he has no intention of ever going back to look at it.

Now, I am all about helping geocachers get their hides listed.

I am a Volunteer Reviewer for no other purpose.

Sure I apply and enforce Groundspeak's Cache Listing Rules and Guidelines, but I represent and work for geocachers.

If there is room for flexibility or discretion in the application of the Guidelines I will almost always exercise it to the benefit of the geocacher.

I will go to great lengths to work with any geocacher to help them configure a cache so that it is listable.

A vibrant, healthy, happy and growing geocaching community is my only pay or reward.

That said, however, I have no desire whatsoever to list a cache like the one above described! Such hides benefit neither the geocaching community nor the listing service that publishes them.

So, knowing something about your turf and travel habits is important to me... and by extension, to you!

Here's how:

Your turf, in my terms, is the area you reside or work in and regularly travel through.

Determining that turf is the reason we ask you to put your home coords in your profile - when you list a cache its distance from your home is one of the things we see and consider.

If it is over 30 miles from your home I will generally inquire as to how often and how quickly you can respond to cache issues.

I know from experience that a 60-mile round trip to change out a wet log is more effort than most geocachers are willing to put into a cache - in which case they don't need to have caches that far away!

If, for example, you are a family man, you have young kids at home, your wife doesn't cache, you've got 0 hides and 30 finds and you work full-time, you can pretty much expect that I will question your ability and dedication to maintaining your new listing on top of a mountain 20 miles away! You're just not likely to have time to go climb that mountain to check on the cache very quickly or often!

On the other hand, if you are retired, are an active cacher with 10 hides and 300 finds and are a participant in your geocaching association's forums, I can better expect that you'll be able and willing to get to that cache in a reasonable timeframe.

Every Reviewer is different, but in most cases my expectation is that you will respond to cache issues within two weeks. That is the maximum time that should elapse between a 'Needs Maintenance' or 'Should Be Archived' note and your going to check on the cache. There are, as in everything, exceptions. If you need an exception just write me! When I don't hear from an owner and two weeks pass after an issue alert I will most likely archive the cache.

This is why we use guidelines instead of rules... geocaching and geocachers need this level of flexibility.

I will also look at the number of caches you've found in the area of your new hide. That's a pretty good indication of the turf you regularly cache - that way when I see you place a new hide way out away from where you normally cache I can pretty much predict that you won't maintain it!

If I have reason to believe that you can't or won't maintain a hide, I may list it based on your note telling me that you will maintain it, but may set a watch on the cache.

If unresolved maintenance issues should arise I will then have no hesitation about archiving the cache, and the experience teaches me something of value to consider for your future hides!

You may travel 100 miles to your lake house once a month. If I know that this is the case I won't have any trouble listing caches along that route, even though they are much farther from your home than I might allow for another geocacher!

Even then, if I see you place a new cache that's not along that route, we are back to square one - I have to determine (and hold up the listing while I ask) is it a vacation cache? A cool place you happened by and will never visit again? Do you have relatives there that you only visit every six months?

Of course your time in the game, your reputation in the caching community, the number of hides you have and where they are, your maintenance history with existing hides as well as our relationship and your past relations with Reviewers all feed into my ability to decide if you are likely to maintain the hide.

Geocaches may in theory live forever, but the minimum lifespan under the guidelines is 90 days.

To list it I have to believe that you can and will maintain it as needed for at least that long and will collect it when you no longer can or desire to keep it up. Therefore I need to know that it is within your normal turf.

There are exceptions, of course.

Vacation caches are not allowed, but occasionally you'll see a cache hundreds of mile from the owner's home, even in another state.

I have several caches near me here in Alabama that are owned by a cacher in California. I have never met the man, but I know that he has a home in both states, spends half the year in each home, has family that lives close to his caches here for whom he provided me phone numbers and who have committed to doing maintenance as and when needed. So far that has worked fine!

There is a caching couple here who are truck drivers; they have caches strung from Miami to New York, but they are actively up and down that route every week or so and no cache of theirs has ever gone two weeks without attention when it needed maintenance.

So, if you have a dependable local maintainer and give me their contact info, or if I know that you are in the area of your new listing frequently, your 'turf' can be vastly extended!

Another way to extend your turf is to co-own a cache with another geocacher. Under the Guidelines co-ownership doesn't exist - one account must own and be responsible for each cache, but it can be done as a cooperative agreement among geocachers.

If you are out of your normal turf and find a location that really begs a geocache, a place you just know geocachers will enjoy, but it's just too far out of your normal travel routine and you know you wouldn't realistically maintain it, team up with a local cacher to place it.

This local cacher will, if he sees the value of this location as you do, likely allow you (or work with you) to place the hide and will list it under his account.

He will actually own it and as far as Groundspeak is concerned he will be singularly responsible for it, but in the listing page he will put both his name and yours as the cache owners, giving you credit and recognition for the placement.

You won't get a statistics bump out of it, it won't show up in your hides list, but geocachers will see and appreciate your involvement, and that's got to be more satisfying than incrementing a number!

This is but another good reason to host and attend events, geocache with others and to be active in the forums and community - if you are known and trusted well enough to work cooperatively with geofriends you can place caches almost anywhere!

As far as the idea, and surely it was mentioned only in jest, of protecting your turf from other cacher's hides - you have that right only on property you own and not one inch further!

What all of this means to you is that anytime you place a hide outside of the normally-accepted 30-or-so miles from home, writing a Reviewer Note when you submit your listing to explain that you can and will be able to maintain it will very likely keep the listing from being held up while I try to contact you!

The more I know about you and your hides the more I can help you. Use the Reviewer Note on all new listings to tell me anything I need to know about the listing and it should sail right on through the review process!

I hope this helps you!
Ed

flannelman
02-14-2006, 09:01 PM
Long post, but a good one!! I always wondered about your whereabouts Naturefish. I didn't think that it would be much fun to find caches that you approved, or maybe it would, I don't know. I never really thought about the turf thing in the reviewing process but that makes perfect sense. I gotta say that was an excellent post that you made. I have other caches planned for my area but some of them may be more than 30 miles from home( my home is nearly 30 miles from anywhere :D ). I will make sure to give you a note to help ease the review process when I do. I also travel to Little Rock at least 2 times each week (70 miles one way) so I may place a cache along the way sometime. Your description of the guy with a fulltime job, wife and three kids fits me perfectly, have you been peeking in my windows? Caching is my weekend activity with the kids and we really enjoy it. Keep up the good work Fish and thanks.

Team_Pink
02-17-2006, 07:08 AM
I get Google Alerts on the topic Geocaching. A large majority of the headlines are something to the effect of "Geocaching - Gamers or Terrorists" . I think the day will come when some stupid person will use a Geocache in a bad way and will severly affect the game. It may not be a bad idea to look at the guidelines and prohibit ammo cans. But that leaves us, me at least, without a good waterproof container. I don't have many finds, but I have never found a wet cache in an ammo can.

What is the best "clear" waterproof container that you have seen, heard of, etc.? I would switch now if I had an alternative.

02-17-2006, 03:17 PM
There isn't exactly a question for the reviewer in there I can find, but as far as weather-proof clear containers you could try a pelican case. Kayakers and open-boaters (canoes) use them to keep things dry on the river, but they might be a little pricey for most people to use for hiding things in the woods. I've never seen even a small one that was less than $10 and the ones the size of ammo cans are closer to $20.

Team_Pink
02-17-2006, 03:23 PM
I ask the reviewer due to his extensive contact and exposure to the various containers used as cache containers.

I'll take my question to another forum.

NatureFish
02-18-2006, 11:32 PM
I get Google Alerts on the topic Geocaching. A large majority of the headlines are something to the effect of "Geocaching - Gamers or Terrorists" . I think the day will come when some stupid person will use a Geocache in a bad way and will severly affect the game. It may not be a bad idea to look at the guidelines and prohibit ammo cans. But that leaves us, me at least, without a good waterproof container. I don't have many finds, but I have never found a wet cache in an ammo can.

What is the best "clear" waterproof container that you have seen, heard of, etc.? I would switch now if I had an alternative.

The most common behind ammo-boxes would be the plastic Lok-N-Lok containers. These have a gasket seal and four flanges that flip down and lock. Wal-Mart sells three sizes nested one-inside-another for about $4. - watertight and will last quite a long while.

As far as negative press and fretting over bomb-squads being called to caches, yes, it happens, no, it's not common, and as our game becomes more known it happens less and less.

Of MAJOR importance here is, of course, permission - if you have permission to place the cache then the container type really doesn't matter!

Explosives Ordinance Disposal professionals are well-trained and well-informed. Part of their continuing education is a series of messages and bulletins that go out nation-wide, indeed world-wide. Geocaching has been and continues to be talked about in these in-house training and information publications and all EOD experts will by now be quite familiar with our game and hides.

That doesn't mean they won't destroy a few - they will - Darwin's Law tells us that bomb-squad technicians who go ahead and pick up a suspect container just because it has a geocaching.com sticker on it won't be part of our gene pool for long!

Here's the deal - negative publicity is loud. It gets attention, it gets published, it gets commentary. It is designed to excite, to upset, to involve the reader, to get you to keep reading the news. Truth has little to do with it. That's why Rush Limbaugh has a larger audience than, say, NPR's Prarie Home Companion. If people can get het up and focused on 'the news' it means they don't have to look inward to their own lives!

Positive publicity, however, is much quieter.

At the moment there are 236695 active caches in 220 countries.

Maybe 5 a year get blown up.

There are dozens of articles written weekly about the positive aspects of geocaching.

I see less than 10 a year that are negative... though those 10 get told and retold ad infinitum in various versions.

It's not a crises, it's not even a blip on the radar.

Need Something To Worry About??

The Department of Labor reports 5703 deaths from on-the-job accidents.

The FAI/IPC reports that a total of 245,162 parachute jumpers made 4,848,025 jumps. 74 died, which makes 1 fatality per 65,513 jumps. Preliminary research gives a ratio of 1:64 091.

The State of Alabama reported 1,154 highway deaths and nationally 42,636 deaths from vehicle accidents were reported.

Of those Alabama reports that 508, or 44%, were attributable to speeding, at a cost to the state of $534 Million.

Of the 508 deaths and $534 Million dollars it is estimated that half would be saved by simply wearing a seatbelt.

Now:
Number of fatalities attributed to geocaches: 0
Number of geocaches found to be bombs: 0
Number of caches discovered to actually be drugs hidden in the woods: 0
Number of bomb-squad-examined caches found to contain illegal items: 0
Number of bomb-squad techs that are gonna go pick up a suspect container because it's clearly marked as a geocache: 0 (or if there are any Darwins Law will weed 'em out!)

If we just have to worry and fret, let's at least worry over what's real!

Ammo boxes are no danger to our game and are still the best container to be found!

Ed

Team_Pink
02-19-2006, 06:34 PM
Thanks for putting everything into perspective! I was becoming disenchanted with the headlines and it's good to know that law enforcement and other government agencies are being made aware of our game.

arkansas_stickerdude
02-26-2006, 06:04 PM
Thats funny and I like my odds at geocaching and Skydivin!!!!!! LOL

Geezer_Veazey
03-20-2006, 07:09 AM
Is the 1/10 mile requirement between caches hard and fast? If the same person owns both caches is it permitted. I would like to place a second cache on my property that would be about 100 - 140 feet from the first. I have already asked myself if I minded and the answer was 'No, I didn't mind'.

OK or not OK? I'm not asking for special consideration - just want to know the rules. Thanks for your help.

Geezer

NatureFish
03-20-2006, 04:14 PM
As the property owner you can do pretty much as you please on it - since owner permission trumps guidelines almost every time!

The main concern is that cachers be able to distinguish one from the other and not log the wrong cache.

Have fun,
Ed

Team_Pink
04-02-2006, 06:54 PM
There seems to be a lot of discussion on Geocaching.com about caches on a route. I am thinking about going to Oregon next summer and would like to plan caches all the way there and back. From the forums, Google Earth seems to be the only way to do this and it is very time cosuming.

Two questions:

Do you know if Jeremy and crew are planning on offering a way to do this often requested feature?

How do YOU plan a multi-state route?

NatureFish
04-02-2006, 10:18 PM
Do you know if Jeremy and crew are planning on offering a way to do this often requested feature?


Yes, it's on the way, no, I don't have an ETA.

It's after midight, and I am just leaving the Great Smokey Mountain GeoQuest weeked event in Knoxville TN headed home to Birmingham.

I will try to point you to some other ways to do it when I get home, in the meantime run a Google search for "geocaches on along route"...that should find several ways to do it - none easy!

Team_Pink
04-03-2006, 10:04 AM
I got all the tricks EXCEPT getting the caches into GSAK. I need Pocket Queries, lots of Pocket Queries!

I have considered trying to get a list of other states Geocaching Associations like ours and see if I could get someone from each state to send me their GSAK database. What do you think the chances of that are? It would be good if we could get a process setup to get each state association to provide this for other states. Put them all on an FTP server or even just provide via email if nothing else. I would volunteer to do Arkansas. I have pocket queries created that cover the state and gets refreshed every week. It would not be a big deal to make that available to cachers from other states. They could then load it and filter for whatever route they might be traveling in Ark.

Gaddiel
04-03-2006, 12:32 PM
I have considered trying to get a list of other states Geocaching Associations like ours and see if I could get someone from each state to send me their GSAK database. What do you think the chances of that are? It would be good if we could get a process setup to get each state association to provide this for other states. Put them all on an FTP server or even just provide via email if nothing else. I would volunteer to do Arkansas. I have pocket queries created that cover the state and gets refreshed every week. It would not be a big deal to make that available to cachers from other states. They could then load it and filter for whatever route they might be traveling in Ark.

Sounds like a neat idea. However, it's my understanding that the PQs have some special rules attached to them. I'm no lawyer, but the license agreement seems to indicate that information contained in PQs are not transferrable. Here's an excerpt (emphasis mine):

Permitted Uses:
· Licensee may install the Data or portions of the Data onto a global positioning system unit [“GPS”] for Licensee's own internal use.
· Licensee may make only one (1) copy of the original Data for archival purposes unless the right to make additional copies is granted to Licensee in writing by GROUNDSPEAK.

Uses Not Permitted:
· Licensee shall not sell, rent, lease, sublicense, lend, assign, time-share, or transfer, in whole or in part, or provide unlicensed third parties access to the Data, Related Materials, any updates, or Licensee's rights under this Agreement.


You can read the full agreement here (http://www.geocaching.com/waypoints/agreement.aspx).

Anybody know more about this?

Wayne

Team_Pink
04-03-2006, 02:05 PM
You appear to be correct. I guess the license agreement is typical - here it is, take it or leave it, THE COMPANY doesn't have to satisfy the user, be flexible, etc etc.

It bites that Groundspeak doesn't provide a method and prevents the user from implementing a workaround. :x

It looks to me like as long as the people involved were paying members it would be ok, but that's me.

NatureFish
04-04-2006, 07:59 PM
The above posts are correct, Groundspeak restricts and closely protects its proprietary Pocket Query data... that product is, after all, their profit center and primary benefit to Premium Members.

Pocket Query generation throws a heavy load on servers, and are the primary load on Groundspeak's infrastructure. The listing service is much less processor-intensive.

So, they are at the same time the most expensive to produce and yet the cheapest deal you can find in geocaching!

Please remember, no one is forcing you to hunt members-only geocaches, nor to download Pocket Queries, only buy them if they benefit you!

As far as their being a for-profit business, will you go to work tomorrow if your employer decides to quit paying you? Shouldn't everyone's work product be free? Why not yours?

Ed

04-05-2006, 10:43 AM
There are (at last glance) about 1800 caches in Arkansas and I use a series of five PQ's to blanket the state for my statewide data base.

If a cacher is going on trip I'd think it'd be pretty easy do something simular for your trip. Just set up a series of points along your route of travel about 100 miles apart and use these coordinates to build PQ's of everything within 150 miles. (the overlap is intentional) You'll end up with a sizable database which GSAK can use as a reference while on the road.

Team_Pink
04-06-2006, 04:20 AM
How do you do the state in 5 queries? It takes me quite a few, otherwise they go over 500 and they start missing caches.

04-07-2006, 02:38 PM
I set up four PQ's centered on each corner of the state, but also limited by state borders and a fifth one centered on Little Rock.

GSAK combines them and shows several caches as "already up to date" but it ends up with the same number as the total for the state on the GC site.

As new ones get added this method may have to be adjusted to six PQ's or some other variant, but so far it's good.

Right now I'm working on finding a pattern that cover TN completely for a road trip this summer, but they have nearly 6000 caches statewide so it will definately take more than 5 PQ's.

04-13-2006, 09:56 PM
Not sure if this is for the reviewer or if I should be asking someone else as it is about tracking numbers.

What I'm trying to find out is if you can buy just a TB tracking number without the tag. I have several potential TB type items in mind to cast out of aluminum and would rather just stamp the number directly into the body of the item rather than have to attach the tag later.

I know you can get geocoins made in small batches and making them trackable costs $1.50 each, but there doesn't see to be a provision for anything other than coins this way. And then with geocoins you have to pay to have a die manufactured, etc so that even small batches come with a big pricetag.

I've even considered making something simular to a geocoin, but only the size of a quarter so it can be dropped in micro caches, but I don't want to have to make a thousand of them. I don't have the facilities for that or the cash to have a thousand of them minted professionally.

IS my only option to buy TB tags, use the numbers and then toss the tags? Seems wasteful to me, both of $ and of the maunfactured tags.

NatureFish
04-14-2006, 08:45 AM
You can buy tracking numbers to be used any way you want (within Groundspeak's Terms of Service) in quantities of 100 for $1.50 each.

I know it seems silly on the face of it to have to pay for numbers, but remember that this is like the perpetual-care cemetary business - you are asking them to track your item forever; there is no lifetime on a Traveler, so they have to invest in databases and servers that may still be tracking your bug in 100 years and have to have its information instantly available!

Send an email to Bryan at contact@groundspeak.com for details.

Have fun,
Ed

04-14-2006, 08:50 PM
Well $150 is still quit a chunk of change to drop all at once, but in the long run would be well worth it, much like buying the TB tags themselves 20 at a time to get the $4.25 price. You know you'll use them eventually....

For that matter I'll still want TB tags some of the time too, only metal castings really lend themselves to having the number stamped into them.

nonnipoppy
04-15-2006, 10:14 AM
There seems to be a lot of discussion on Geocaching.com about caches on a route. I am thinking about going to Oregon next summer and would like to plan caches all the way there and back. From the forums, Google Earth seems to be the only way to do this and it is very time cosuming.
.

We struggle with this every time we plan a trip. Generally we look at an overview of the intended route using the map of GC.com. Then we choose strategic areas to center our PQs on. Look up the zip codes and set up the PQ with <100 caches each. You can get 35 a week 5 per day.

This is pretty hit and miss but then using GSAK we combine them all to one file and export to Mapsource. We can move in the mapsource program pretty well and we then set up the arc or polygon filter in GSAK and trim the cache count down. Since our GPs will hold 1000 cache coords we just get all that we can and proceed.

Depending on out time we will cache only close to the route or in clusters along the route. We were recently given MS Streets and Trips and are anxious to try this and see if it is better. If you want to discuss this feel free to call or visit us. Check the clue of our cache Hockeyology for phone number.

BTW I have seen a discussion in the GC.com forum that some state organizations are putting together info about caches along major routes in their states. That info is found here (http://forums.groundspeak.com/GC/index.php?showtopic=80274).

Good luck, poppy

OKC_Nightcrawler
04-15-2006, 07:13 PM
Ammo boxes are no danger to our game and are still the best container to be found!

Ed

We had a geocache detonated by the Edmond Police department here in OK yesterday morning. As far as I know, It was not an ammo can. I think it was a camo taped rubbermaid container. The sgt involved is planning to attend our next monthly meeting...

Gaddiel
04-15-2006, 08:15 PM
Since our GPs will hold 1000 cache coords...

Doesn't this sound like part of another thread? :D